Me Like Words
Tuesday, September 12, 2006
 
Cold Shoulder
Snub: a refusal to recognize someone you know

Nothing feels quite as bad as getting the cold shoulder from someone you love, especially if that someone is your Dad...why wouldn't he just play catch with me? Anyway, ignoring a friend is nothing new and neither is this phrase which has its roots in jolly old England at about the time Willy Shakes was writing his plays.

Back in those days it was common to have visitors and travellers drop in unannounced. Hotels didn't really exist yet and your best bet for finding a bed was to just knock on someone's door. Now, if someone agreed to let you in they were also obligated to feed you, which is a great custom. Most visitors got good hearty food but if someone came in who was a persona non grata he would be given the less than desirable cut of meat: the cold shoulder of beef.

The phrase stuck and travelled the time highway all the way to us. It was the best our ancestors knew how to insult someone; they didn't have "Yo Mama" back then.

Now imagine eating it cold...
 
Comments:
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
 
that shit straight up cold yo. you gotta holla at a nigga you keen on.

eyo, what about a ghetto entry to appease a few white motherfuckers i know that been wondering where the fuck "WORD" as a statement of understanding or praise came from??

-1
 
i'm pretty sure big eddie ed is just a white guy pretending to be black for kicks
 
simi:

I'm pretty sure that you gotta be fucking kidding me if you gonna even waste time posting that.
 
eddie ed:

did u just waste your "precious" time, writing that for me? and did u come back to see this. hahaha
 
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I (me) like words. And even more than liking words I like to know where they come from and how they ended up in my mouth. It's called 'Etymology,' and I hope you like words as much as me do. If you have a word or phrase you've been pondering send it to me at Streeter@StreeterSeidell.com with 'Me Like Words' as the subject.

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